Damn! Aren’t You Tired of Trying to Overcome Someday? (Why the 60s Failed)

22 02 2019

Hetepu (Peace & Blessings) Family.

First, let me start by saying one more time that I am grateful for the sacrifices and contributions that those before us have made. It is the main reason we are able to talk and express ourselves freely. In fact, I recall Brother Bobby Hemmit saying in one lecture how because of the Civil Rights Movement, he could go any  occult and metaphysical shop in the south, which could not be achieved had it not been for desegregation.  Now, that being said, let’s use this time and platform to talk real.

So, every time it is Black History Month, after going through the list of names of people and the contributions they made. Eventually we come to that period in time that leaves a bad taste in everyone’s mouth, the Civil Rights era where we see the same images of people having fire hoses turned against them, dogs attack them and literally folks being beat down for basic rights.  For some strange odd reason (or not) after listing all of the sacrifices and contributions that were made, Black History Month celebrated in most churches and communities around the country always seems to conclude with us all singing (all together…yes I am a bit cynical today) “We Shall Overcome.”

You might get mad with me but so what. It needs to be said. It always concludes with folks begging to be treated equal.

When we folks get it? After all of the contributions, all of the sacrifices, all of the inventions, all of the advancements, etc. If you still have to sing, “We shall overcome…” They are not going to let you OVERCOME.

I mean seriously…am I the only one who can see this? Why are folks so concerned with trying to get other people to accept and respect them? I mean, when you see a bum on the street begging for change, do you respect them as your equal? No. You respect them as a human being but that’s it. If you respect them as your equal, then take them inside of your home with your family them.  If you have commonsense you will not, but this is what folks keep doing every year by asking to be accepted by compromising their ancestral principles.

Now, let’s talk spiritually plain.  The reason folks keep singing this and coming back asking about “What happened in the 1960s?” Is because a type of soul loss occurred. Yeah, folks lost their mind because it was a traumatic era but it has never been recovered because we keep looking at history from a western cultural perspective.

In western society, the purpose of history is to tell his-story which is simply a list of names, dates and faces.  We read and study history from a western cultural perspective much like we do with Kemetic, Akan, Yoruba, Kongo, etc. history. We don’t study history from our own cultural perspective, which is to invoke it by talking to our Ancestors who lived during that time.

Family. In the Story of Osar, Hru (Heru, Horus) defeats Set because Djahuti (Tahuti, Tehuti, Thoth) performs a ceremony that allows the deceased Osar (Ancestor) to speak.

The reason the 60s, 70s and every decade afterward has failed us is because our folks did not invoke their Ancestors and Spirit Guides. If they had invoked their Ancestors and Guides, our spirits of the dead would have reminded them just like Osar reminded the tribunal of the evils that were perpetrated on folks for 400+ years prior to the 1960s.  Instead, folks want to forgive and forget that slavery ever occurred, yet complain about how things are not fair in contemporary times.  If they had invoked the ancestors, the ancestors would have given them dreams of deals being made in secret, etc.

It is interesting that folks are willing to forgive and forget slavery so easily yet, they can’t even forgive or forget the $20 they lent a family member or friend.

HRU (Heru, Horus)

Family, we need to change this. If you know how to work with your ancestors and spirit guides, you need to start really communicating with them because if not. These people who are chasing the selfish American dream are going to lead everyone off the cliff.  This is the time we need our ancestors and spirit guides foresight and insight more than ever.  The only way we as Hru can reclaim our birthright is with the help of our Osares.

 





Why They Don’t Want You To Remember You Are A God/Goddess?

20 02 2019

Hetepu (Peace & Blessings) Family

I hope that you are all doing well upon reading this post but this is something I have been struggling with for a while.  And, I thought it would be a great time to discuss it as we come to another end of another Black History Month.

So, let me begin by saying that I am grateful for all of the contributions that were made by our historical ancestors such as Fredrick Douglas, Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth and the list goes on, but question. Why does Black History begin with our ancestors as captives in this country?

I mean, it is a known fact that majority of our African ancestors who were abducted, kidnapped, enslaved and brought to North America were from Central and West Africa. So, why don’t “they” start Black History stories by stating that Europeans abducted, kidnapped and enslaved people from the Kongo Kingdom, Akan Kingdom, the Kingdom of Benin, the Wagadu (Kingdom of Ghana) and so on?

Again, I am grateful for the inventions made by Garret Morgan, Charles Drew, George Washington Carver, etc. but why don’t “they” state in the beginning that “they” abducted, kidnapped and enslaved scientists, engineers, artists, musicians, inventors, doctors, priests and priestesses, etc.? Instead of alluding that these Garret Morgan, Charles Drew, George Washington Carver, and many others were an exception to the rule?

I mean, I tried watching Kevin Hart’s Guide to Black History twice and I simply had to turn it off because it was not a guide but it was the same black history propaganda that you find in most history books.  Please note, I am not knocking the special but simply stating that this is not our purpose.

So, it made me ask why they do not want to talk about real Black History, and the answer that came back is because a lot of people simply do not want to know.

It is easier to accept that Black History began in this country as a slave because to admit that it doesn’t would mean that we were tribal Africans, which in the minds of a lot of people conjures up stereotypical images of black people dancing around fire. In other words, it is easier to accept that Black History began with our ancestors beings slaves because folks don’t want to be African.

And, I get it. It makes sense. Who wants to admit to being an African who lived in a mud hut back then? Who wants to claim that they descended from a people that simply warred and sold their own into slavery? Who wants to align themselves with a “people” who had gold practically falling out of the sky, yet they walked around not valuing it but instead would fight over trinkets? Who wants to align themselves with a people that simply stick pins in dolls and focus more on revenge then on spiritual development? No one does. At least not anyone who is in their right mind.

But, why admit that Black History began before slavery? Because it ties us back to Africa by indicating that our ancestors were members of a tribal nation, who are the descendants of the people that migrated to Central and West Africa from Kemet (Ancient Egypt), initially out of Kush (Ancient Nubia/Ethiopia).

In other words, the reason “they” always start Black History when our recent ancestors were enslaved is to make us forget how old we are and thereby forget our true identity as Gods and Goddesses.

Do you know that the only reason Garret Morgan, Charles Drew, George Washington Carver, and many others were able to advance is because they were given a chance? Please note, I am not trying to take anything away from them and I am not claiming that they did not have any struggles that they had to overcome because I know they did, but think about this.  What would happen if we were all given equal and equitable opportunities? What would happen if we were all given the same chance? Yes, the world would change instantly.

So, when Dr. Carter G. Woodson started Black History week, it served a purpose but now.  Black History month is simply a carrot on the stick to make us chase after the “American Dream” of being accepted as equals but we need to realize.

We are not equal.

There is no one in this world that has undergone the same experience that we have gone through. No one will ever be equal to us and why would we want to be equal to someone in the first place? To be equal means to be ordinary and to be ordinary means to be like everyone else, a follower.

So, where did we get this notion that we should be followers?

From religion.  Religion is a tool for social control and slavery began when our ancestors chose to believe that God existed outside of themselves and not within. We can blame Christianity as much as we want to but the facts are that our ancestors were prepped to be slaves before Christian and Islamic missionaries step foot on African soil.

What I am saying is that we have all been fooled into thinking that slavery was about particular period in time where our recent ancestors were forced to labor in this country and abroad. No, Family. Slavery is a system designed to make people forget who they truly are by taking away their will and desire to be free.

Family. We are Gods and Goddesses, which means all we need to do is decide that we want to do something and do it. If it works for us and helps others that is all that we need.  We don’t need anyone to validate what we do because we are the first to do it, hence the meaning of a God and Goddess. It is time to stop studying history and start invoking it. Instead of just teaching our daughters about Madame C.J. Walker, how about we start teaching our daughters how to be a Goddess like Hatshepsut?  Instead of teaching our sons about Seqenenre Dao who fought against the Hyskos?





Kamitic/Kemetic Spirituality and Love

15 03 2010

Post originally appeared on the Land of Kam website at 3/3/10

I dedicate this post to my grandparents. Thanks for teaching me about true love.

Kamitic/Kemetic Spirituality is real and in regards to love it is powerful.  Last month, TV1 featured during Black History month some movies that made an impact on Black American culture. As I sat book and looked at some of these films I remember growing up seeing those influences and the impact it has had upon many of us today.  Now, don’t get me wrong. I love some blaxploitation movies like the next man. I was fond of Shaft, (THE REAL) Foxy Brown, and I really like Black Cesar but let’s be serious, none of these movies were really Culturally relevant. Yeah, they helped us to move beyond certain issues and take pride in our physical characteristics but they also damaged us spiritually I believe in regards to true African American spirituality and relationships. One film that sort of hinted upon this was Mario Van Peebles’ Panther, where he showed a lot of women were expected to just sit back and support their man as he went to fight da man.

Now, what amazes me about people claiming to be reconstructionists or resurrectionists of the Kamitic/Kemetic Way.  Is that when you look at them you find that they are not dedicated to any of the principles as it relates to health, which are virtues that were guarded by the sisters. Now, I am not casting stones but if you look at the wall art and sculptures you see that the Kamau weren’t grossly overweight people.  In regards to family, men weren’t all macho-breadwinners and women just sat at home and supported their husbands. This idea that women of Kamit/Kemet were queens that were either weak, soft-spoken women or hardcore women, and men were just warriors is a total Euro-centric view based upon Euro-centric fairy tales, history and Euro-centric values. This is why there are so many women claiming to honor the lioness spirit Sekhmet, the energy/spirit of female hard-coreness (She is a dragon-lady).

True Kamitic/Kemetic Spirituality in regards to Love/Relationships was based upon the concepts and principles of Maa (Divine Law, Order, Balance and Harmony) and personified through the spirit Maat. This means true Kamitic/Kemetic Spirituality was based upon the idea and belief that everything that exists plays a part/role in a bigger whole of things. In short everything was related like a family.  True Kamticism does not value one sex over another. Both chauvanism and feminism are wrong stemming from Euro-centric way of life. True Kamiticism is holistic meaning both male and female are interdependent upon each other in order to create life, peace and harmony for all because he and she is a reflection of the Divine.

I came to this conclusion on what true Kamitic/Kemetic Spirituality is especially in regards to relationship by observing how my grandfather and grandmother interacted with each other. They like most couples had their ups and downs but in the end they were able to assist me in this subject because they had been married for over 60 years, hence the proof is in the pudding.  And before they passed, they still hit on each other like they were teenagers falling in love for the first time. My grandfather never hit my grandmother and instructed his sons not to do so as well because it was a sign of cowardice. He also instructed his sons never to give a woman a reason to want to hit him.  At the same time, my grandmother never provoked my grandfather to hit her because she explained to my mother and aunts that it was a sign of weakness. She also told them the same thing, never give a man a reason to hit them either. Both the women and the men were taught to protect themselves but as you can see they were both given practical, insightful wisdom that dealt with inner strengths and outer weaknesses.

Did my grandparents get angry with each other? Of course, they did.  Anytime you are dealing with another person there’s bound to be some disagreement.  In fact, many times I remember my grandmother stubbornly walking to Sunday school because my grandfather was late to church (she couldn’t drive). At the same time, I remember this same determination of my grandmother being used to make my grandfather humble himself and do whatever she wanted. They were interesting to watch because they never sent each other a cuss. They never physically fought each other like couples do today because they respected each other and respected each others’ input to the whole.  If you get what I am saying, you will see that my grandfather and grandmother were a tag team couple. They were completely different yet at the same time similar because they were interdependent upon each other. They complimented and got on each other nerves at the same time, while still loving each other for 60, I believe 75 years of marriage (they were married at age 17 and 16). The thing I learned from them, is that they never let their emotions get the best of them.

The best way I can describe how my grandparents functioned with each other is by the old hoodoo adage “whatever works” to keep the peace, harmony and love amongst each other without disrespecting the other. This was their formula for success. Yes, my grandfather was about being macho, a real man, which is why he hunted (like a lot of the older men did back in the day) for food for the family (not just for sport), he ate raw oysters and did other “manly things”.  While my grandmother did “womanly things” like wore lovely dresses adorned, sweet seductive perfume with the superfly hats black women love to wear, she was a mean cook in the kitchen, but these were all part of their characters. These roles, or tasks didn’t define who they were and they sure as hell didn’t mean anything to them when it came to their family.

Taken after 60 Years of Marriage

I am reminded by my ancestors that you have a right and left hand, and this is what man and woman are in regards to Kamitic spirituality and love. It is all about complimentary to the whole. So, it begs me to ask this question, if your spirituality is not complimenting your physical well being, or your relationship isn’t prospering like it should that maybe it is based upon the Greek-Roman-Egyptian invading culture that came after most of the Africans of Kamit left.