Kamitic and Sub-Saharan African Comparison Beliefs

14 01 2012

Hetepu (Peace) Family

I just wanted to provide this little tidbit that helped me to see the connection between the Kamitic people and Sub-Sahara Africa. This is from Sir E. A. Wallis Budge’s book, Osiris: The Egyptian Religion of Resurrection. Today many people disregards Budge’s work because he was one of the first to acknowledge that the Kamitic people were of black and brown African descent. At the time when most of the Western world was swayed by their Eurocentric ideology of superiority. Here are a few of the comparisons he made:

* The Moon, rather than the sun, is associated with the Supreme God among the Kamitians and among todays people living along the Nile, Congo and Niger. Budge notes that new moon festivals is found all over Africa and is commonly associated, as it was in Kamit, with the remembrance, by kings and commoners, of their sins, and by prayers for protection from evil spirits. He cited examples such as the Mendi, Tshi (also known as the Oji tribe are a group of people living in Ghana), and Ilogo (Central Africa Republic) and various peoples in the Sudan and Tanganyika. Note the yowa and maa aankh cosmogram.

*The Kamitian concept of the ka, meaning “double” has its counterpart throughout wide regions of Africa. Among the Tshi it is known as the kra or kla meaning “soul” and as doshi among the Bantu (in South Africa) which means literally “double” (as in the Kamitian).  In both Kamit and the rest of Africa, the ka differs from the Western idea of “soul.”  The Kamitians and the modern African had the idea of at least three types of “souls” inhabiting each person.  The ka is an immaterial double of the physical body  that persists after death. The ka though is distinct from the person, is a type of guardian spirit.  The ka in both Africa and Kamit must be cared for after a person dies or the ka itself will perish.  Kamitians and Africans made images in which the ka dwelt and to these were offered meals and worship.

*The sahu or “spirit-body” arose in the “Other World” after one’s death.  Among the Tshi, the “shadowy person” that comes to live in the “Other World” after death is known as the Srahman.  Similar ideas were cited among the West African tribes of Yoruba, Uvengwa and Baluba.  Like the ba, the sahu could perish in certain circumstances.

*The Kamitians considered the shadow or khaibit as a type of “soul.”  Similar beliefs among the Nsism, Wanyamwesi, Nandi and busuko and in various parts of the Lower Niger, Congo, Southern Guinea and Mashonaland were mentioned by Budge.

*The khu was the imperishable spirit and had its counterpart in the “dual soul” concept of West Africa.  The belief in transmigration of the dual soul and shadow was common in Africa.  Reincarnation was widely found among the people of the Niger Delta who made a practice of identifying which people in a community were the souls of persons deceased in earlier times.   Among the Pygmies, Banza and West Mubangi the spirit was reincarnated in animal form and this type of belief was held by some segments of the Kamitian population.

* In Kamit, offerings were made to ancestors in the form of meals placed on a stone slabs in the ancestor’s tomb.  Budge’s notes that stone slabs were used for the same purpose among the Buvuma islanders (Ruvuma and Soga tribes of the coast of Uganda). The offering of meals to ancestors in spiritual temples or houses is widely found through much of Africa and Budge cites examples among the Bakongo people (aka. the Kongo) who dwell along the Atlantic coast of Africa from Pointe-Noire, Congo (Brazzaville) to Luanda, Angola, the Sukuma people (aka. Basukuma, Wasukuma, Zukuma) live in small villages in the northern part of Tanzania, Makarakas (Southern Sudanese tribe), and in East and West African peoples.

*Deification of ancestor heroes is common practice in much of Africa. Budge noted that Osar (Asar, Osiris) in the form of Khenti-Amenti stands as an ancestor God of Kamit while Oset (Aset, Isis) is the ancestor Goddess. He noted the uncanny resemblance between the widespread African practice of giving birth in the “bush” to a bas relief found at Philae. Among Africans, birth in the bush is done in solitude with the father and the shaman waiting in the comfortable distance until after the delivery. The bas relief at Philae shows Oset (Aset, Isis) in a stylized papyrus swamp suckling Hru (Heru, Horus). The papyrus would thus stand for the “bush.” Standing on either side of Oset (Aset, Isis) is Amun Ra, representing the African father, and Djahuti (Tehuti, Thoth) representing the African shaman. Budge thought the symbol found under Oset (Aset, Isis) could represent the placenta and blood associated with child birth.  Interestingly, Budge cited a passage in which Oset (Aset, Isis) speaks of her loneliness during labor, which mirrors the African tradition of giving child birth in solitude.  Examples were given about tribes in Sudan (Nuba, Nuer, Dinka, Shilluk) and Uganda.

*The importance of the cow as the most sacred of animals is found in Kamit and in many parts of Africa especially among the tribes living along the Nile and in the Great Lakes region. Of particular importance was the sacrifice of bulls at the funerals of the deceased. The sacrifice of two bulls at funerals is detailed in “The Opening of the Mouth.”

 

*Amulets were seen as partial residences for ancestral spirits in Kamit and throughout Africa. Budge noted the “fetish” quality of amulets, often stressed by Western observers, is secondary to the importance of communion with the ancestors.

*The beetle and the frog are amulets of new life in both Kamit and modern Africa.

*The tall hats and horned crowns worn by African chiefs resemble the white crown and horned crowns worn by Osar (Asar, Osiris). Examples given among the Congo tribes of Bayanzi, Imbangela, Lomari, Lulongo-Maringo, Bangala, Ngombe (a.k.a. Poto), Alunda. Two ostrich feathers decorate the crown of Osar (Asar, Osiris).  Also, these feathers were worn by various peoples of Africa.

*The plaited beard, which was common in Kamitian art, were common among the Markakas, Mpungu (of Namibia), Fang, Alunda (of Congo) and Luba (of Central Africa), as well as other parts of Africa.

*The scalework on the body of Osar (Asar, Osiris) is thought to be related to the body painting or tattooing found various African peoples particularly those in Sudan.

*Budge noted that both the modern Africans and Kamitians practiced preservation of the dead body: “The Kamitians removed the intestines and brain, and embalmed it the body with great skill, and then swathed it in linen, and laid it in a coffin or sarcophagus.  The modern African removes the more perishable part of the body by ways described in detail by the book, and dries or smokes the corpse very effectively.  He also anoints with unguents, and wraps it up in much cloth, and then places it in a coffin or a bier.” (p. 90)

*The mention of the jawbones of the deceased Unas, Re-stau amd enemies of Hru (Heru, Horus) in Kamitian texts are explained by the African practice of removing and preserving the jawbones of kings, or using the jawbones of enemies as trophies.  Specifically mentioned are the Sudani, Dahomey, Baganda, Ashante, and various peoples of Uganda.

*Both modern Africans and Kamitians took care to protect the buried body from contact with the earth, was seen as contaminating.  The African burial usually consists of a deep pit, which a niche is carved so that the body does not come into contact with the earth.  The Kamitian tomb was also built in a pit with a sarcophagus taking the role of the niche.  In some African burials the niche was sealed off with stones as with the Kamitian sarcophagus.

*The Kamitians, like modern Africans, saw the journey to the “Other World” after death as difficult.  In both cases, rituals were performed to “open the way” for the deceased.

*The Kamitian concept of Duat found its counterpart in the African “God’s Town” or “Njambi’s Town.”

*The concept of divine kingship linked ancient and modern cultures.

*Budge noted that spitting had a religious meaning among Kamitians.  He found similar beliefs among the Kordofan, Dyur, Barotze (Zambezi), Nandi, Suk, Kytch and Masa.

*The use of multiple “mighty names” among Kamitians was similar to the use of “strong names” among African peoples.

*Budge mentions that the Kamitians commonly made figures of steatopygous women.  He mentions mentions specifically the dolls and representations at the 4th Kamitian room in the British museum.  He compares these with the figures of the steatopygous queen and the princess of Punt.

It was these observations that led me to discover the cosmological system I was told to call the Maa Aankh.

Maa Aankh with Utchat

Maa Aankh with Utchat

Hope this helps.

Hetepu

 





Maat is not Karma or Karmic Debt

12 03 2011

The first time I wrote this post, some people were a little taken back and wanted me to clarify what I meant by Maa and Maat, so here we go.  According to Kamitic philosophy, Maa is balance, order, justice, righteousness, etc.  and it was personified as a woman wearing a feather plume on her head, while carrying a scale. In one of the pans of the scale was a heart and the other was a feather. The personification of Maa was called Maat.

Now because most of the Kamitic writings have been lost, many Western philosophers while trying to understand the Maa drew upon Eastern philosophy and equated Maa with Karma. This type of syncretism occurs all of the time between cultures, but the problem that arose was that true understanding of Karma is not correct. The concept that most have about karma was created by the elite in India to oppress the masses, but that’s another story.

Anyway, as a result, when most people think about karma they interpret it two ways and in both, to the extreme. The first way to see karma is like Earl as karmic debt.  They will not do anything wrong because they don’t want to be punished in the next life. Funny thing is that most people who believe in karma don’t even believe in reincarnation. Anyway, as a result, they go to the extreme with it and will allow people to walk all over them for fear that if they defend themselves. They will incur the wrath of God.

The second way they interpret karma is the other way, as Divine Retribution. So, they will not act or move because they are waiting for some Cosmic Balance to set the record straight.  You know those people who are waiting for divine justice from genocide, divine justice from slavery, divine justice from anyone that has wrong them. This is actually a spill over from the Western philosophers who wrote, “Vengeance is mine, saith the Lord.”

None of these approaches are Maa.

Maa first off is not a set of codes, laws and rules commanding you what you should and should not do or else.  Maa is a concept and principle based upon understanding how to work the Spirit of God.  A lot of people got this wrong, myself included when I first set off on this road because I didn’t understand the Spirit. My misunderstanding of Maa was due to my belief in generational curses.

You see, I once believed that I had inherited some real bad traits from my paternal grandfather, because I was told so many times during my childhood how much I favored him. After my grandfather passed, I discovered some things that my father and grandfather had a very estranged relationship. My grandfather not knowing better was not very supportive of my father, so when my father had children. He had promised to do better than my grandfather, but he was not very supportive of me and my brothers. This is what convinced me that there was a generational curse on us and that it had to do with Maa.  I also have an aunt who got pregnant at an early age, who had several daughters that did the exact same thing. So I thought this was all due to Maa and reincarnation, but this was wrong, thankfully.

The Maa is based upon understanding the Spirit.  The Spirit of God is omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent. The keyword is omni-present, which means the Spirit focuses on the present, not the past and not the future. This is why in order to be successful in meditation and they tell you when to use affirmations, do it in the present-tense, not the future because it will never happen.

So, Maa is about doing what is right in order to successfully tap into the Power of God within and stay connected to it.  This means living your life by closely observing the cause and effects of your actions and behaviors in the present, so that you can create your future. Not living in the past or worried about what action you take how it will effect your future.

It was because of the Maa, I was able to look at the mistakes my grandfather and father made and decide that I was not going to take the same path they took. This is why I ended up on the Kamitic road because I wanted to make a difference.

Maa does not mean if you get smacked take it. Ummm, unless you have an ulterior motive like Dr. King, maa says defend and protect yourself and love ones from harm.  If an injustice is being committed, maa says speak against it, shame Set (the Kamitic devil) and uplift the Kingdom of Osar. Maa says live in the present and allow the understanding of cause and effect to guide your actions and decisions, because when you do so. That’s when all forms of evolution takes place.

Maa means balance because it is the only road that brings balance. This is why on the maa aankh, the maa stretches vertically from KAMTA (spiritual) and to TASETT (physical). It is symbolizes that when there is Maa both realms (the spiritual and physical) are in balance, there is order, conditions are right, etc.

Many of us are selling ourselves and those we care about short because we are not living Maa. We are full of ideas, have some wonderful talents but are not using them and allowing the Spirit to express itself through us because of fear what might happen. We have studied metaphysics and all sorts of sciences and our relationships are a disaster, finances not the best, children are living all helter skelter, etc. These are all signs of imbalance, which comes from seeing the limitations of the physical.


The time has come shake off your shackles because Maa brings freedom. Maa allows you to see the whole picture, both the limited physical and unlimited spiritual (see the maa aankh).  When there is imbalance it is usually because we are too physical and have not tapped into the higher aspects of the Spirit, hence KAMTA.

Let Maa make positive changes in your life today by learning how to listen to the Spirit. Maa is not about restricting you from moving or living your life.  Maa remember is about cause and effect, so if you put forth the effort to make a positive change today.  Guess what?  You will find an equal amount of spiritual assistance on the other side in KAMTA supporting your effort and shaping tomorrow.  Maa states that if you do what’s right now, you will be protected in the future. Make positive investments in your children now and in the future they will care for their elders. Give birth to revolutionary change now and the children of today will restore the way of the ancestors.

That’s BALANCE. That’s ORDER – That’s Maa. Maa is about positive action done today that yields positive results tomorrow and vice versa.

So, do the maa (right) -thing!

For a complete discourse see:
Kamta:
A Practical Kamtic Path for Obtaining Power





The Importance of the Ab (Spiritual Heart)

7 03 2011

Do you know why it is important to strengthen and develop your ab (spiritual heart)? Many don’t know or understand the concept of free will and the soul because Westerners are afraid of death and see it as being the end. In Afrospiritual traditions, death is not the end.  Death is the start of something new, but in order to make this transformation we have to have a strong ab (spiritual heart).

It is the ab that makes the entire Kamitic theology clear, because our ab is tied to the whole Kamitic spiritual hierarchy and the concept of life after death.  This is a pretty interesting yet complex concept to understand because it doesn’t correlate to Western thinking exactly. Like I said, Western thinking in linear and sees death as being the end, whereas African (and non-Western) thought is circular and holistic.  So, below is how my aakhu (ancestral spirits) explained this concept to me through a shamanic meditation and divination session.  This is what seems to make the most sense to me so, I will try to make this as simple as possible for you all.

We are all spiritual beings that have been infused into a physical body. Our spirit is composed of nine parts (incorrectly called souls) and they are : the khab, khabit, ka, sahu, ab, ren, shekhem, khu and ba. These parts of our spirit are more like consciousness and they can be grouped into three divisions called the ba, sahu and ab.

The first division of the spirit that we are given is our ba (divine conscious), which is said to be the divine spark from God. Our ba provides us with khu (divine wisdom), shekhem (divine power) and ren (our divine name, hence destiny).  The purpose of the ba is to help us to spiritually survive.  The ba was symbolized as a human headed falcon to indicate that it like a trained bird of prey will return back to its original owner or God.  So we have it the ba is closely assoicated with our breath. When body expires its last breath, the ba will return back to God. Besides providing our being with life, the ba draws all of its inspiration from the spiritual realm of the universe.  When we sleep, it is the ba that provides us with our dreams by flying wherever it needs to go and communicating the message from the spirit world to the other parts of our being. The ba corresponds to the unconscious. All living beings have a ba. The ba does not reincarnate but is new so that every living being has a fresh start or new and unique experience.

When we are born, we are also given a second divisions called a sahu (physical-body conscious) that governs our khab (physical body), khabit (emotions/animal instincts), and ka (personality), because the purpose of the sahu is to help us to physically survive.  To accomplish this feat, our sahu, which is also contains our genetic memories, draws all of what we need to know from the external environment. Our sahu corresponds to the subconscious mind. All living beings have a sahu. The sahu (and its associated parts) reincarnates but only biologically by following one’s lineage in order to provide every  living being with the genetic memory to survive. This is how animals through evolution acquire a certain distinctive pattern. In human beings this is how we acquire the physical features, behaviors, etc. of our foreparents.

We are also given an ab (spiritual heart or human conscious), which corresponds to our conscious mind but when we are born, our ab is not strong. This is the reason we have to learn right from wrong, how to be courageous and ethical in the face of fear.  We have to strengthen it, which occurs over a course of time.  For most, we do not come into the understanding of our ab until we are teenagers.  It is then that we learn that our ab is responsible for providing us with free will.  It is through our ab we are able to make choices and decisions, but our choices and decisions are influenced by the maa (divine law).  As a result, our ab grows and becomes stronger based upon the consequences of our actions and behaviors. It is through the maa that we develop a conscience or strong ab.  Only man and woman has been given ab and this is what makes us unique amongst all of the other beings and connects us to God. It is this uniqueness that intimately connects our ab to our ba. It is because of the connection between the ab and the ba that we all feel like we have a higher calling. It is our ab that is the eternal part of our being and the surviving conscious that is reborn.

When an individual physically dies, the ba, which was given to us to help us to spiritually survive, returns to the spiritual aspect of the Universe from whence it came from. The sahu, which was given to us to help us to physically survive returns to the physical aspect of the Universe from whence it came from. The ab, which is the eternal part of our being is the division of the spirit that survives the physical death experience.



So after death, the newly deceased remains with their body until they are able to pass into the otherworld or KAMTA with a clear conscience or strong ab. (Please note that this entire experience has been fictionized as the Kamitic Weighing of the Heart).  If the living remembers the deceased as being a purely evil individual. It will cause their ab to be so heavy, that their guilt (depicted as the Aummit monster) would totally consume their ab and prevent them from ever returning to the land of the living – TASETT to wreak havoc upon humankind. Although this is rare, this usually is what happens to individuals who in life encouraged a lot of chaos and confusion like Hitler and other beast men and women.  Most of the time, Aummit will be sent to fetch these individuals, which is why usually these individuals (like Hitler) commit suicide.

If the living remembers the deceased as being a troublemaker that attracted trouble in life usually due to ignorance, misguidance, wrong choices and decisions, etc., which resulted in the deceased dying a violent death or through suicide. It will cause the deceased to have a heavy ab, thus preventing them from passing into other world because now they have grave concerns that are on their mind. Since the choices these individuals made in life caused them to be shunned. In death they are shunned (not spoken of), which makes them visit the places they frequented in life. It is at these places (their homes, bars, clubs, alleyways, etc.) they influence the living with their negative and destructive ways. These deceased are called aapepu (snakes or worms) because they were parasites when they were alive and the maa causes them to be parasites in death. We encounter these negative spirits or ghost whenever we are walking and all of sudden for no apparent reason get an eerie chill up our spine, or for no reason at all have sudden thoughts of anxiety, depression, etc. Other times we know that we may have encountered an aapepu whenever we have an eerie hot and cold sensation, which is proof that these spirits are stuck in TASETT since the desert can become both extremely hot and cold temperature-wise.

If the living remembers the deceased as being an ethical and honorable individual in life. Then the deceased is able to pass into KAMTA with a light ab (clear conscience) where they will become an aakhu (ancestral spirit and spirit guide).   God allows the aakhu to be honored and venerated like the Christian martyrs and saints because in life these individuals chose to live a righteous life even in the face of death. It is through their courageous acts of bravery that these individals were tranformed and became emissaries for the Divine. This explains how biological, cultural, historical and mythical individuals even after dying tragically became aakhu like the Preto Velhos (Old Slaves in Brazil), known as Uncle Joe and Auntie (or Papa Joe and Big Momma in the US), El Negro Jose and La Madama in Afro-Cuban spiritual traditions.  It is because their ab has been made strong and pure.  Since, the aakhu can only address issues that they were familiar with in life.  Many aakhu choose to return to the land of the living where they are born through their descendants to master more skills. Others choose to return to the land of the living to assist their descendants by acting as spirit guides and speaking to us through our visions and dreams.

If the deceased after returning to the land of the living and dying with a light heart, numerous times, passes to KAMTA multiple times. The aakhu amongst the aakhu becomes a netcharu (netjaru, neteru, guardian spirit or principle of nature) because they have transformed beyond the organic birth-life-death-rebirth cycle. The netcharu are the masters of all technology and the guardians of God’s mysteries. They are the ones an individual must appeal to in order to master a particular skill and talent from God. The netcharu speak to us through quick flashes of insight. When they make themselves known, it renders us speechless temporarily because it is hard to literally explain what had just occurred. When we encounter the netcharu it is because our awareness had slipped into KAMTA – the underworld – and upon realizing what had occurred returned to the land of the living.

The netcharu exist as a clan of unique spirits and I believe the first and older netcharu  are the original founders and leaders of people.  It is this connection that ties the netcharu to everyone regardless if one believes in them or not. The older the netcharu the more it was associated with a particular aspect of nature and the more permanent it has become. Fortunately, new netcharu are being created everyday and these younger netcharu are more easy accessible and act as representatives of their clans. For instance, the original Osar is associated with agriculture, morality and stability, which caused him to be connected to the ground and pillars, hence foundation. Osar manifests himself in the mountains, but his representatives or spiritual children can be found in white stones like limestone.  The legendary Mother of all mothers,  Oset (Aset, Auset, Isis) is associated with the life giving waters and is identified with the sea. She as the ocean is permanent, but her representatives or spiritual child (essence) can be found in certain seashells.

Because death is not the final resting place and the maa mirrors the spiritual and physical world. Lower spirits can advance to the next level, just like human beings. They just have to work hard to do it because this is part of the maa. It is because of the maa, spirits can be offered prayers, light, water, money, the recitation of the psalms, rituals like the novena, and so on, which can elevate the ab of the spirit.

This is why it is best to work on developing and strengthening your ab now, so that upon death. You will have a light ab and be well received by the ancestors that have preceded you.

Excerpts for this post are from Kamta: A Practical Kamitic Path for Obtaining Power by Derric “Rau Khu” Moore, 2011.

All rights reserved.  Copyright Land of Kam 2010 & 2011








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